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6.2. Installation/Building the VCF

6.2.1. Where the heck do I get this from ?
6.2.2. Do I have to use CVS ?
6.2.3. What about SSH ?
6.2.4. What other libraries do I need to get the VCF to run?
6.2.5. What do I need to build ? Why do I have to build anything ? Can't I just get the binaries ?
6.2.6. The documentation mentions a folder named "bin" which must be included in the system path. I do not see any bin folder. Where is it?
6.2.7. Using Visual C++ I get compiler errors complaining that it can't find certain files. What do I do?
6.2.8. Using GCC I get compiler errors complaining that it can't find certain files. What do I do?
6.2.9. Using Visual C++ I get linker errors. What do I do?
6.2.10. When I run my program (using Visual C++) I get weird crashes and memory overwrites
6.2.11. When I attempt to compile with Visual C++ 6, I get an Internal Compiler Error. What do I do?
6.2.12. I am using BoundsChecker, and it claims I have all sorts of memory leaks? Is this really correct?
6.2.13. Can I use the VCF without writing a GUI?
6.2.1.

Where the heck do I get this from ?

You can get the VCF from the "Files" section at the Source Forge project page. Alternately you can also get the VCF from CVS, either in the current stable release, or directly from the most recent (potentially unstable) development release.

6.2.2.

Do I have to use CVS ?

If you want to get the VCF sources from the CVS source tree, or be able to contribute to the VCF as developer, yes. Otherwise you can get the source from the project's file downloads page, and submit patches for VCF devlopers to patch into the CVS tree.

6.2.3.

What about SSH ?

To use allow people to securely use CVS, Source Forge uses SSH. Most linux installations have this installed (as well as CVS), and Win32 users can get this set up and running by downloading and installing Cygwin.

6.2.4.

What other libraries do I need to get the VCF to run?

This partly depends on the platform you use. For Win32 platforms the VCF has everything it needs in the source distribution. For Linux platforms you'll need GTK 2 (and whatever libraries that GTK requires).

6.2.5.

What do I need to build ? Why do I have to build anything ? Can't I just get the binaries ?

For Win32 system's you can download the entire VCF including pre-built binaries, documentation, source, and MSDN integration all in one easy installer. As other platform ports become complete, similar installers will be made available.

In terms of what parts of VCF you have build, this is partially dependant on how you plan to use it. For console applications, it's likely that hte FoundationKit library is all you need. For GUI applications, you'll most likely want the ApplicationKit, which in turn requires the GraphicsKit and FoundationKit libraries.

6.2.6.

The documentation mentions a folder named "bin" which must be included in the system path. I do not see any bin folder. Where is it?

When you download the source code, the "bin" and "lib" directories do not exist. When you build the source code, these will be created automatically as part of the build process. The "bin" directory holds the linked binary files (like .DLL/.so or .exe files) and the "lib" directory holds .lib or .a files. If you installed the VCF through the installer, these directories will exist since the pre-built binaries will be installed there.

6.2.7.

Using Visual C++ I get compiler errors complaining that it can't find certain files. What do I do?

Make sure that Visual C++ can find the vcf/include directory. This is what the VCF_INCLUDE environment variable is for. An alternate solution (for Visual C++) is to add the vcf/include directory to the global list of include directories that Visual C++ searches through. To do this

  • Go to "Tools > Options..."

  • Click on the "Options" tab.

  • In the "Show Directories for:" drop down, select "Include files".

  • Go to the end of the list, double click a blank item and add teh path to wherever the vcf/include directory is found on your system.

  • Click "OK" and you should be good to go.

6.2.8.

Using GCC I get compiler errors complaining that it can't find certain files. What do I do?

Ensure that the make file is correctly pointing to wherever the vcf/include is on your machine. If your building the VCF from the makefile, this shouldn't be a problem. If you're having problems with building you own applications that use the VCF, make sure you are including some thing like "-I $(VCF_INCLUDE)" in your make files.

6.2.9.

Using Visual C++ I get linker errors. What do I do?

You probably do not have the vcf/lib directory in Visual C++'s lib path.

6.2.10.

When I run my program (using Visual C++) I get weird crashes and memory overwrites

Make sure your code generation options match the VCF's (or any other library you may link to). You should be using the "Multi Threaded DLL" or "Debug Multi Threaded DLL" (/MD or /MDd, respectively). If you don't do this, then memory that you allocate and delete will run into problems with other libraries memory management.

6.2.11.

When I attempt to compile with Visual C++ 6, I get an Internal Compiler Error. What do I do?

Make sure that you have installed Service Pack 5 for Visual Studio C++. Also the Standard version of Visual C++ seems to have some problems, so you'll need to use the Professional or Enterprise version.

6.2.12.

I am using BoundsChecker, and it claims I have all sorts of memory leaks? Is this really correct?

Bounds Checker 6.x for Visual C++ tends to "quit" too early, and thus reports any memory that it thinks is still allocated as "leaks", regardless if the memory is freed by the application later on. This is a known bug, and affects other libraries that do their own memory reporting, and can safely be ignored. If you are in debug mode, and have the memory traps for VCF enabled (they are on by default), then any objects (that are directly or indirectly derived from VCF::Object) that have not been freed are reported by the VCF.

6.2.13.

Can I use the VCF without writing a GUI?

You most certainly can! Applications that do not need a user interface can simply link to the FoundationKit library.

Should your application need graphics support (but not want or need any of the various GUI classes, such as controls, etc), it can link to the GraphicsKit library (this is in addition to the FoundationKit).

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